NTSE - Language Comprehensive Test - General English - Cloze Test

Question - 1

Tibet ______ up images of a mystic land. Snow-capped mountain peaks pierce the blue sky and fierce chilly winds sweep the rolling grasslands. Maroon-robed Buddhist monks pray in remote monasteries and sturdy horsemen pound the rugged earth. People in this high plateau perform punishing rituals like prostrating hundreds of miles in tattered clothes on pilgrimage. Spirits, spells and flying apparitions are part of the Tibetan world. In short, Tibet remains an exotic. Such images are largely the result of books by Western travellers and explorers in the last century, which helped in keeping the mystique alive. And when the Communist rulers took over Tibet in the 1950s and began imposing Chinese language and culture on the people, Tibet's own history started to recede in the background. Thus, the only books available in English to Tsering Wangmo Dhompa as a young girl growing up in India and Nepal as a refugee were those written by Westerners, and so she came to view the country as a forbidden land, a place where fantasy and fable collaborated against a dramatic backdrop of mountains, black magic and people with strange customs and appearances.

  • A makes
  • B conjures
  • C puts
  • D toil

Question - 2

Tibet conjures up images of a mystic land. Snow-capped mountain peaks pierce the blue sky and fierce chilly winds sweep the rolling grasslands. Maroon-robed Buddhist monks pray in remote monasteries and ______ horsemen pound the rugged earth. People in this high plateau perform punishing rituals like prostrating hundreds of miles in tattered clothes on pilgrimage. Spirits, spells and flying apparitions are part of the Tibetan world. In short, Tibet remains an exotic. Such images are largely the result of books by Western travellers and explorers in the last century, which helped in keeping the mystique alive. And when the Communist rulers took over Tibet in the 1950s and began imposing Chinese language and culture on the people, Tibet's own history started to recede in the background. Thus, the only books available in English to Tsering Wangmo Dhompa as a young girl growing up in India and Nepal as a refugee were those written by Westerners, and so she came to view the country as a forbidden land, a place where fantasy and fable collaborated against a dramatic backdrop of mountains, black magic and people with strange customs and appearances.

  • A sturdy
  • B wobbly
  • C handsome
  • D herculean

Question - 3

Tibet conjures up images of a mystic land. Snow-capped mountain peaks pierce the blue sky and fierce chilly winds sweep the rolling grasslands. Maroon-robed Buddhist monks pray in remote monasteries and sturdy horsemen pound the rugged earth. People in this high plateau perform punishing rituals like prostrating hundreds of miles in tattered clothes on pilgrimage. Spirits, spells and flying apparitions are part of the Tibetan world. In short, Tibet remains an exotic. Such images are largely the result of books by Western travellers and explorers in the last century, which helped in keeping the mystique alive. And when the Communist rulers took over Tibet in the 1950s and began ______ Chinese language and culture on the people, Tibet's own history started to recede in the background. Thus, the only books available in English to Tsering Wangmo Dhompa as a young girl growing up in India and Nepal as a refugee were those written by Westerners, and so she came to view the country as a forbidden land, a place where fantasy and fable collaborated against a dramatic backdrop of mountains, black magic and people with strange customs and appearances.

  • A implementing
  • B evading
  • C imposing
  • D experimenting

Question - 4

Tibet conjures up images of a mystic land. Snow-capped mountain peaks pierce the blue sky and fierce chilly winds sweep the rolling grasslands. Maroon-robed Buddhist monks pray in remote monasteries and sturdy horsemen pound the rugged earth. People in this high plateau perform punishing rituals like prostrating hundreds of miles in tattered clothes on pilgrimage. Spirits, spells and flying apparitions are part of the Tibetan world. In short, Tibet remains an exotic. Such images are largely the result of books by Western travellers and explorers in the last century, which helped in keeping the mystique alive. And when the Communist rulers took over Tibet in the 1950s and began imposing Chinese language and culture on the people, Tibet's own history started to ______ in the background. Thus, the only books available in English to Tsering Wangmo Dhompa as a young girl growing up in India and Nepal as a refugee were those written by Westerners, and so she came to view the country as a forbidden land, a place where fantasy and fable collaborated against a dramatic backdrop of mountains, black magic and people with strange customs and appearances.

  • A amplify
  • B stretch
  • C die
  • D recede

Question - 5

Tibet conjures up images of a mystic land. Snow-capped mountain peaks pierce the blue sky and fierce chilly winds sweep the rolling grasslands. Maroon-robed Buddhist monks pray in remote monasteries and sturdy horsemen pound the rugged earth. People in this high plateau perform punishing rituals like prostrating hundreds of miles in tattered clothes on pilgrimage. Spirits, spells and flying apparitions are part of the Tibetan world. In short, Tibet remains an exotic. Such images are largely the result of books by Western travellers and explorers in the last century, which helped in keeping the mystique alive. And when the Communist rulers took over Tibet in the 1950s and began imposing Chinese language and culture on the people, Tibet's own history started to recede in the background. Thus, the only books available in English to Tsering Wangmo Dhompa as a young girl growing up in India and Nepal as a refugee _____ those written by Westerners, and so she came to view the country as a forbidden land, a place where fantasy and fable collaborated against a dramatic backdrop of mountains, black magic and people with strange customs and appearances.

  • A are
  • B have been
  • C was
  • D were

Question - 6

Vaccination is a term coined by Edward Jenner for the ______of administering live, albeit weakened, microbes to patients, with the intent of conferring immunity against a targeted form of a related disease agent. Vaccination (Latin: Vacca-cow) is so named because the first vaccine was derived from a virus affecting cows: the cowpox virus, a relatively benign virus that, in its weakened form, provides a degree of immunity to smallpox, a contagious and deadly disease. In common speech, 'vaccination' and 'immunization' generally have the same colloquial meaning.
Vaccination efforts were initially met with some resistance before early success brought widespread
acceptance and mass vaccination campaigns were undertaken. The eradication of smallpox is considered the most spectacular success of vaccination. The last natural case of smallpox was discovered on October 26, 1977, in Somali(a) This date is considered the anniversary of the eradication of smallpox.
Modern-day critics of vaccination are concerned that childhood vaccination plays a role in autoimmune disease and autism, though large-scale scientific studies have failed to find a link.
In the generic sense, the process of triggering immune response, in an effort to protect against infectious disease, the works by 'priming' the immune system with an 'immunogen'. Stimulating immune response, via use of an infectious agent, is known as immunization. Vaccinations involve the administration of one or more immunogens, in the form of live, but weakened (attenuated) infectious agents, which normally are either weaker, but closely-related species (as with smallpox and cowpox), or strains weakened by some process. In such cases, an immunogen is called a vaccine.
Some modern vaccines are administered after the patient already has contracted a disease, as in the cases of experimental AIDS, cancer and Alzheimer's disease vaccines.Vaccinia given after exposure to smallpox, within the first four days, is reported to eradicate the disease considerably, as vaccination within the first week is thought to be beneficial to a degree. The essential theory behind such immunizations is that the vaccine triggers superior immune response than the natural infection itself.

  • A process
  • B transmission
  • C procedure
  • D growing

Question - 7

Vaccination is a term coined by Edward Jenner for the process of administering live , albeit weakened, microbes to patients, with the intent of conferring immunity against a targeted form of a related _______ agent. Vaccination (Latin: vacca -cow) is so named because the first vaccine was derived from a virus affecting cows: the cowpox virus, a relatively benign virus that, in its weakened form, provides a degree of immunity to smallpox, a contagious and deadly disease. In common speech, 'vaccination' and 'immunization' generally have the same colloquial meaning.
Vaccination efforts were initially met with some resistance before early success brought widespread acceptance and mass vaccination campaigns were undertaken. The eradication of smallpox is considered the most spectacular success of vaccination. The last natural case of smallpox was discovered on October 26, 1977 in Somali(a) This date is considered the anniversary of the eradication of smallpox.
Modern-day critics of vaccination are concerned that childhood vaccination plays a role in autoimmune disease and autism, though large-scale scientific studies have failed to find a link.
In the generic sense, the process of triggering immune  response, in an effort to protect against infectious disease, the works by 'priming' the immune system with an 'immunogen'. Stimulating immune response, via use of an infectious agent, is known as immunization. Vaccinations involve the administration of one or more immunogens, in the form of live , but weakened (attenuated) infectious agents, which normally are either weaker, but closely-related species (as with smallpox and cowpox), or strains weakened by some process. In such cases, an immunogen is called a vaccine.
Some modern vaccines are administered after the patient already has contracted a disease, as in the cases of experimental AIDS, cancer and Alzheimer's disease vaccines.Vaccinia given after exposure to smallpox, within the first four days, is reported to eradicate the disease considerably, as vaccination within the first week is thought to be beneficial to a degree. The essential theory behind such immunizations is that the vaccine triggers superior immune response than the natural infection itself.

  • A sick
  • B unhealthy
  • C disease
  • D sickness

Question - 8

Vaccination is a term coined by Edward Jenner for the process of administering live , albeit weakened, microbes to patients, with the intent of conferring immunity against a targeted form of a related disease agent. Vaccination (Latin: vacca -cow) is so named because the first vaccine was derived from a virus affecting cows: the cowpox virus, a relatively benign virus that, in its ______ form, provides a degree of immunity to smallpox, a contagious and deadly disease. In common speech, 'vaccination' and 'immunization' generally have the same colloquial meaning.
Vaccination efforts were initially met with some resistance before early success brought widespread acceptance and mass vaccination campaigns were undertaken. The eradication of smallpox is considered the most spectacular success of vaccination. The last natural case of smallpox was discovered on October 26, 1977 in Somali(a) This date is considered the anniversary of the eradication of smallpox.
Modern-day critics of vaccination are concerned that childhood vaccination plays a role in autoimmune disease and autism, though large-scale scientific studies have failed to find a link.
In the generic sense, the process of triggering immune  response, in an effort to protect against infectious disease, the works by 'priming' the immune system with an 'immunogen'. Stimulating immune response, via use of an infectious agent, is known as immunization. Vaccinations involve the administration of one or more immunogens, in the form of live , but weakened (attenuated) infectious agents, which normally are either weaker, but closely-related species (as with smallpox and cowpox), or strains weakened by some process. In such cases, an immunogen is called a vaccine.
Some modern vaccines are administered after the patient already has contracted a disease, as in the cases of experimental AIDS, cancer and Alzheimer's disease vaccines.Vaccinia given after exposure to smallpox, within the first four days, is reported to eradicate the disease considerably, as vaccination within the first week is thought to be beneficial to a degree. The essential theory behind such immunizations is that the vaccine triggers superior immune response than the natural infection itself.

  • A healthy
  • B demi
  • C sick
  • D weakened

Question - 9

Vaccination is a term coined by Edward Jenner for the process of administering live , albeit weakened, microbes to patients, with the intent of conferring immunity against a targeted form of a related disease agent. Vaccination (Latin: vacca -cow) is so named because the first vaccine was derived from a virus affecting cows: the cowpox virus, a relatively benign virus that, in its weakened form, provides a degree of immunity to smallpox, a contagious and _____disease. In common speech, 'vaccination' and 'immunization' generally have the same colloquial meaning.
Vaccination efforts were initially met with some resistance before early success brought widespread acceptance and mass vaccination campaigns were undertaken. The eradication of smallpox is considered the most spectacular success of vaccination. The last natural case of smallpox was discovered on October 26, 1977 in Somali(a) This date is considered the anniversary of the eradication of smallpox.
Modern-day critics of vaccination are concerned that childhood vaccination plays a role in autoimmune disease and autism, though large-scale scientific studies have failed to find a link.
In the generic sense, the process of triggering immune  response, in an effort to protect against infectious disease, the works by 'priming' the immune system with an 'immunogen'. Stimulating immune response, via use of an infectious agent, is known as immunization. Vaccinations involve the administration of one or more immunogens, in the form of live , but weakened (attenuated) infectious agents, which normally are either weaker, but closely-related species (as with smallpox and cowpox), or strains weakened by some process. In such cases, an immunogen is called a vaccine.
Some modern vaccines are administered after the patient already has contracted a disease, as in the cases of experimental AIDS, cancer and Alzheimer's disease vaccines.Vaccinia given after exposure to smallpox, within the first four days, is reported to eradicate the disease considerably, as vaccination within the first week is thought to be beneficial to a degree. The essential theory behind such immunizations is that the vaccine triggers superior immune response than the natural infection itself.

  • A deathable
  • B dead
  • C deadly
  • D deathly

Question - 10

Vaccination is a term coined by Edward Jenner for the process of administering live , albeit weakened, microbes to patients, with the intent of conferring immunity against a targeted form of a related disease agent. Vaccination (Latin: vacca -cow) is so named because the first vaccine was derived from a virus affecting cows: the cowpox virus, a relatively benign virus that, in its weakened form, provides a degree of immunity to smallpox, a contagious and deadly disease. In common speech, 'vaccination' and 'immunization' generally have the same colloquial meaning.
Vaccination efforts were initially met with some resistance before early success brought widespread acceptance and mass vaccination campaigns were undertaken. The eradication of smallpox is considered the most spectacular success of vaccination. The last natural case of smallpox was discovered on October 26, 1977 in Somali(a) This date is considered the anniversary of the ______ of smallpox.
Modern-day critics of vaccination are concerned that childhood vaccination plays a role in autoimmune disease and autism, though large-scale scientific studies have failed to find a link.
In the generic sense, the process of triggering immune  response, in an effort to protect against infectious disease, the works by 'priming' the immune system with an 'immunogen'. Stimulating immune response, via use of an infectious agent, is known as immunization. Vaccinations involve the administration of one or more immunogens, in the form of live , but weakened (attenuated) infectious agents, which normally are either weaker, but closely-related species (as with smallpox and cowpox), or strains weakened by some process. In such cases, an immunogen is called a vaccine.
Some modern vaccines are administered after the patient already has contracted a disease, as in the cases of experimental AIDS, cancer and Alzheimer's disease vaccines.Vaccinia given after exposure to smallpox, within the first four days, is reported to eradicate the disease considerably, as vaccination within the first week is thought to be beneficial to a degree. The essential theory behind such immunizations is that the vaccine triggers superior immune response than the natural infection itself.

  • A eradication
  • B existence
  • C killing
  • D terminate
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